» » Cleaning Firearms, Part 4: The How for the Glock

Cleaning Firearms, Part 4: The How for the Glock

posted in: Featured, Firearms, How-To, Shooting | 2

In the previous parts of the Cleaning Firearms series of articles, I discussed how I clean a firearm with regards to the AR-15 rifle. Cleaning a semi-automatic pistol is much like cleaning a rifle, except it takes less time due to the smaller gun.

Ocab-20160220-192341-600

Thus, my personal cleaning procedure for general cleaning of a pistol is similar to that of a rifle such as the AR-15, except scaled down. In the discussion of cleaning a pistol, I will use the Glock 17 (Gen 3) as the example firearm. Glock pistols are very prevalent, so this is a good pistol in which to use for a demonstration. Plus, cleaning other semi-automatic pistols are going to be conducted in nearly the same manner.

I break down the Glock into it’s sub-groups, just like I do with the AR-15 for cleaning. But the three component groups for the Glock pistol are:

  1. Frame
  2. Slide
  3. Barrel

Ocab-20160220-192448-600

I begin by spraying down the slide and the barrel with MPro-7 gun cleaner. I want the MPro-7 to soak into the bore to loosen the dried up fouling for easier cleaning. While this is happening, I first start on the slide.

Stage 1

Cleaning the slide is quite simple. I’ll use a nylon brush to scrub down and agitate any dried fouling in the slide. Then I use a shop towel with MPro-7 to wipe down the internal and external surfaces of the slide.

Ocab-20160220-194046-600

That’s pretty much it for the slide. I don’t strip the slide internals for post-range cleaning. Unless the gun gets wet (e.g. submersed in water, rained on), I won’t strip the slide internals for cleaning.

Stage 2

After cleaning the slide, I will proceed to cleaning the barrel. I will brush the bore several times to loosed the fouling in the bore lands.

Ocab-20160220-194547-600

After brushing the bore, I will then run through the barrel several times with wet (MPro-7) and dry patches on a pierce-style jag, until there is minimal to no fouling streaks on the patches.

Ocab-20160220-195239-600

After the bore is cleaned out, I will clean off any fouling on the externals of the barrel, including the barrel hood areas, recoil spring lug area, and the chamber area with a nylon brush and a shop towel.

Afterwards, I will spray out the chamber and bore with brake cleaner to get any residual fouling and gun cleaner.

Ocab-20160220-195640-600

Stage 3

The final stage consists of cleaning the frame. I usually don’t have to do much in this area. What I like to do is clean off the slide rails on the frame with a nylon brush and shop towel with MPro-7. I will also wipe off all the visible surfaces of the trigger group (trigger bar, ejector, housing, etc). I will wipe off the surfaces of the frame as well as the inside of the magazine well with a shop towel damp with MPro-7.

Ocab-20160220-195814-600

Final Stage

After everything is cleaned up, I proceed to lubricate the Glock with Slip2000 EWL. I will put an oily patch through the bore to give a light surface coating for rust prevention. I will wipe down the barrel with a shop towel and Slip2000 EWL. I will also spread a coating of oil all over the internal an external surfaces of the slide, and put extra oil on the slide rail grooves.

Ocab-20160220-200116-600

The frame will get oil on the slide rails.

Ocab-20160220-200159-600

Then I reassemble the pistol and put oil on the barrel hood area, and cycle the slide several times, and afterwards, wipe down the gun with a shop towel to remove excess oil.

Ocab-20160220-200521-600

This is my procedures for cleaning the Glock pistol. While this is meant to be an article discussing how I clean a pistol, and isn’t the only way to clean, I think the procedures I have described is quite similar to how the majority of pistol owners clean their handguns.

Follow ocabj:
Owner and administrator of ocabj.net
Latest posts from

2 Responses

  1. Gaston Gonzalez
    |

    Great, detailed write-up. I assume that this procedure works well for smaller autos such as the Ruger LCP .380?

  2. ocabj
    |

    Yup. Pretty much the same.

Comment on this post

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.